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Dia de los Muertos - Celebrating the Day of the Dead

Dia de los Muertos - Celebrating the Day of the Dead
Dia de los Muertos - Celebrating the Day of the Dead

We're all familiar with the classic sugar skull paintings in honor of Dia de los Muertos, but have you ever stopped to wonder what this celebration represents?

Taking place a day after Halloween, many believe this day marks the Mexican version of Halloween—that is far from the case!

What's believed to be a somber event is actually one filled with life! Here's what you can expect the next time this celebration rolls around.

What Does Day of the Dead Celebrate?

November 1st or 2nd marks the day we celebrate with loved ones who have passed.

Families create offerings, known as ofrendas, to honor deceased family members. They play the deceased's favorite music, make their favorite meals, and include photos of them on an altar. This tradition encourages visits from loved ones who have gone too soon.

Themes specific to Dia de los Muertos include skulls, offerings, and Mexican Marigolds.

Skulls (Calaveras)

Day of the Dead is home to the classic sugar skulls. These can take many forms, the most popular being sugar candies, face paintings, and clay decorations.

These skulls are often smiling and decorated with vibrant colors and patterns. Family members place them with the loved one's offerings in hopes their spirit will find them.

Contrary to belief, this celebration isn't a sad one. It's filled with life as the living celebrate amongst the dead (also the reason behind the face paintings).

Offerings (Ofrendas)

This tradition revolves around the offerings made by the living to the dead.

Ofrendas consist of many things: sugar skulls made from clay, beautiful flowers, food, music, photographs, and more. The offerings are placed neatly on the altar for the deceased.

Mexican Marigolds (Flor de Muerto)

Mexican Marigolds are short, bushy plants with orange, yellow, and mahogany flower heads. They're well-known for their bright colors and aromatic foliage.

Their pleasant fragrance and captivating colors guide the deceased to their offerings. Why Marigolds? The belief is that this flower accents the pathway that guides loved ones (or spirits) to their ofrendas.

Mexican Marigolds are more commonly known as Flor de Muerto, which is Spanish for Flower of Dead.

Frida Kahlo Case

Need an iPhone or Android case to go with this holiday?

Our Casely x Frida Kahlo collection features a new case to celebrate Dia de los Muertos and Frida Kahlo. It showcases pointillism, also known as dot art, in blue, orange, pink, and purple hues.

On several occasions, Frida was photographed in her home holding a skull. She also included skulls in many of her paintings. This case is a special way to honor her and those who have passed.

Remember and celebrate Frida with this sugar skull-inspired Day of the Dead case!

In Conclusion

The timing of Dia de los Muertos is just a coincidence, not to be confused with a Mexican Halloween. Honor your passed loved ones and celebrate their presence in your life with a Frida Kahlo case from Casely, some ofrendas, and their favorite music and foods.

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